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UCL Engineering EU referendum responses

and guidance on the result

A Message From the Provost



The outcome of the referendum is now known. While UCL did not take a formal position during the referendum campaign, I have given my personal view and you will have heard many other voices from the UCL community. The loss of EU membership will have a clear impact on universities such as UCL, particularly around the mobility of students and funding of research.

Today, more than ever, I want to reaffirm that UCL remains a global university through our outlook, people and enduring international partnerships. I also want in particular to address UCL’s staff and students from all countries of the European Union. We value you enormously – your contribution to UCL life is intrinsic to what the university stands for.

This morning, I have reassured UCL staff and students that, barring unilateral action from the UK government, the vote to leave the European Union does not mean there will be any immediate material change to the immigration status of current and prospective EU students and staff, nor to the UK university sector’s participation in EU programmes such as Horizon 2020 and Erasmus+. Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty foresees a two-year negotiation process between the UK and other member states, during which time the terms of the UK’s exit from the European Union will be decided.

There will be many questions from many people in the UCL community and beyond about what this vote means for UCL. We will address these as a matter of priority as the details become clear.

UCL President & Provost, Professor Michael Arthur

A Message from the Dean of Engineering

Nigel Titchener Hooker

Nigel Titchener-Hooker

I want to reassure  all  students and staff of my support as valued members of our engineering community. Our mission of Change the World remains as true as ever in what will inevitably be uncertain times.

We are part of  a truly global university with a vision and reach that is unique. With our many valued partners we will continue to demonstrate leadership. We will have to be patient and keep cool heads as we navigate in uncharted waters. I am confident however that we can do this and remain strong, successful and above all, inclusive.

Dean of Engineering, Professor Nigel Titchener-Hooker


A Message from the Vice Dean, Research

Tony KenyonTony Kenyon

The UK will remain a full member of the EU for at least the next two years, and as such will continue to participate fully in EU funded research programmes – principally Horizon 2020 and the European Research Council. After that, it is clear that the UK will negotiate to retain access to EU funding on as favourable terms as possible (you can see Jo Johnson’s statement here). It is highly likely that we will still be able to apply for funding as, perhaps, an Affiliate Member state. UK Science and Engineering in general, and UCL in particular, punches well above its weight globally, and has made a major contribution to European research over decades. I don’t see how that will be very different in the future. UCL, as London’s global university, is especially well-placed to maximise the opportunities that will arise, and in the Engineering faculty we are particularly outward-looking and well connected to Europe.

In practical terms, the message is that those of you who hold existing research contracts with H2020 and the ERC should assume that they will continue to run to the end of the project. Those of you who are about to negotiate contacts should continue to do so, and those of you who are writing, or beginning to think about writing, new proposals should carry on. We have an excellent track record of success with the EU funding agencies, and we should build on that momentum.

These are uncertain times, but one certainty is that UCL remains a research powerhouse, and is fantastically well placed to maintain that position and perhaps to help define the new relationship that UK Science and Engineering will have with Europe.

Vice Dean: Research, Professor Tony Kenyon

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Universities UK have provided some early guidance to answer some common staff and student questions. Please find this below.
Guidance for UCL staff and student groups

EU staff

Your immigration status has not changed as a result of the vote. This will remain the case until the Government decides otherwise.

Current EU students

Your immigration status and associated fee status, as well as your access to the student loan book, have not changed as a result of the vote. This will remain the case until the Government decides otherwise.

EU students with a place to start in academic year 2016/17 and 2017/18

At this stage, there is no reason to assume any change to your immigration status or access to the student loan book.

EU students studying in the UK under the Erasmus programme

Your immigration status has not changed, and that you continue to be eligible for your Erasmus grant until at least as long as we remain a member of the EU – and could well be extended beyond this.

UK students studying in the EU and elsewhere under the Erasmus programme

Your immigration status has not changed, and you continue to be eligible for your Erasmus grant until at least as long as we remain a member of the EU and could well be extended beyond this.

All staff currently undertaking EU funded projects

The UK’s status as a full participating member of the Horizon 2020 programme has not changed as a result of the referendum vote – existing project grants and contracts will be honoured unless or until advised otherwise.