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Over one million new engineers needed in UK by 2020

Women account for less than ten per cent of the workforce
Over one million new engineers needed in UK by 2020

Students learning how to communicate with light

More than one million new engineers and technicians will be needed in the UK over the next five years, according to research by the Royal Academy of Engineering.

The analysis found that despite the skills shortage, women account for less than ten per cent of the sector's workforce.

Such findings follow on from recent research published by the campaign group WISE, which revealed that the UK has the lowest proportion of female engineers in Europe.

June 23rd 2015 marked the second annual National Women in Engineering Day (NWED), designed to showcase the broad range of career opportunities available to women. Staff and students from the department participated in events at UCL to celebrate amazing women engineers - see photos from the events involving many local school children

unloc-women.jpgSeveral of the leading engineers of the UNLOC team at both UCL and Aston University are women including Professor Polina Bayvel and Dr Lidia Galdino from UCL and Professor Lin Zhang, Dr Mary McCarthy and Dr Mariia Sorokina from Aston. UNLOC is the UK research programme focused on unlocking (maximising) the capacity of optical communications. Professor Bayvel has spent her career in engineering working on Communicating with Light: and is a leader in her field.

This week, UCL researchers from UNLOC have been showing pupils how to communicate with light at the Big Bang Fair taking place at Newham College and Westminster Kingsway College, with thousands of school children attending.

2nd year UCL EEE undergraduate, Nedeen Alsharif said:

"I feel that I belong to this department. Everyone is very supportive and friendly, there is no gender discrimination. In fact this place feels like my second home."

About National Women in Engineering Day (NWED)

NWED is the brainchild of Dawn Bonfield, president of the Women's Engineering Society (WES). She saw the organisation's 95th anniversary last year as an opportunity to celebrate the work that women do in engineering and to encourage more girls to enter the profession